Martmaduke

oatzy:

Sensational She-Hulk #33

Writer/Artist: John Byrne

oatzy:

Sensational She-Hulk #33

Writer/Artist: John Byrne

philnoto:

The Hank Pym Photo Archives come to Marvel Comics!  It was just announced at NYCC that I will be doing 20 variant covers for the month of February in the style of the “photos” that I’ve posted on my blog in the past. Thank you to everyone who has favorited/liked/reblogged these pieces in the past. This wouldn’t have happened without you!

Guess I’m gonna go broke trying to find all of these variants from one of my all-time favorite artists. THANKS, PHIL NOTO.

fuckyeahavengingarcher:

Hawkeye #001 by Jeff Lemire & Ramón Perez
Following the conclusion of Matt Fraction and David Aja’s acclaimed run, Marvel relaunches the Hawkeye Ongoing with a new creative team— Jeff Lemire, of Green Arrrow-fame, and Ramón Perez, who has worked on John Carter and other Marvel books.
About the series, Lemire says: “One thing that I was really interested in is Hawkeye’s childhood and Barney’s childhood in the circus. And Matt Fraction did some really beautiful scenes with Clint and Barney as kids that really touched me. And I really wanted to keep going with that and experimenting with it so the first arc is split pretty evenly between Clint and Kate in the present and Barney and Clint in the past as kids in the circus. We’re looking at how the things that they did in the past are affecting Clint and Kate in the present. It’s this cause and effect thing. It’s really exploring Hawkeye from two different angles. We have Clint and Barney as kids and what’s that means to them as Hawkeye is just forming and then we have Kate and Clint now, and what Hawkeye is at the moment. This really allows Ramón to visually play with the past and present and it’s something that I’ve done a lot in the past too. A lot of my indie books like “Essex County” and “The Underwater Welder” really juxtapose past and present and in a lot of ways, this book feels really close to those for me. Exploring childhood and things like that.”
Clint and Kate’s next series of adventures launches in March 2015. 


I’ll miss Fraction’s run, but I’m definitely looking forward to this.

fuckyeahavengingarcher:

Hawkeye #001 by Jeff Lemire & Ramón Perez

Following the conclusion of Matt Fraction and David Aja’s acclaimed run, Marvel relaunches the Hawkeye Ongoing with a new creative team— Jeff Lemire, of Green Arrrow-fame, and Ramón Perez, who has worked on John Carter and other Marvel books.

About the series, Lemire says: “One thing that I was really interested in is Hawkeye’s childhood and Barney’s childhood in the circus. And Matt Fraction did some really beautiful scenes with Clint and Barney as kids that really touched me. And I really wanted to keep going with that and experimenting with it so the first arc is split pretty evenly between Clint and Kate in the present and Barney and Clint in the past as kids in the circus. We’re looking at how the things that they did in the past are affecting Clint and Kate in the present. It’s this cause and effect thing. It’s really exploring Hawkeye from two different angles. We have Clint and Barney as kids and what’s that means to them as Hawkeye is just forming and then we have Kate and Clint now, and what Hawkeye is at the moment. This really allows Ramón to visually play with the past and present and it’s something that I’ve done a lot in the past too. A lot of my indie books like “Essex County” and “The Underwater Welder” really juxtapose past and present and in a lot of ways, this book feels really close to those for me. Exploring childhood and things like that.”

Clint and Kate’s next series of adventures launches in March 2015. 

I’ll miss Fraction’s run, but I’m definitely looking forward to this.

(Source: comicbookresources.com, via makeyouanocean)

pyrrhiccomedy:

moniquill:

accioharo:

blackandyellowdoodles:

justacynicalirishman:

babyshibe:

doctorgaylove:

thecoppercow:

That Mysterious “S” Thing We Used to Draw (by the1janitor)

We used to draw this as kids and it’s always confused me. It still really bothers me tbh.

This is really creepy tbh.

yeah we used to draw these! around 2002. at the time i was told it was like the slipknot logo but now i know it’s totally not. but we did used to get in trouble for drawing them.

we never got in trouble with them. I had them all over my school planner lol. 

(We did call them ‘super S’) 

There’s this awesome book I read called ‘The People in the Playground’ which concerns the observations of an anthropologist on children’s folklore: the stuff that kids independently teach one another in school yards and playgrounds that has no real connection to adult lore and media. This is a great example of it, as are hand clapping and jump rope verses.


If you can finish the lines “Miss Mary Mack Mack Mack all dressed in black black black…” or ‘Hinky Pinky Ponky, Daddy had a donkey…”or “Miss Suzy had a steamboat…” or “Engine Engine number nine…”

stop and think about where you learned them.


It probably wasn’t from an adult or out of a book or in any formal way. It was from another kid; someone a grade ahead of you or someone’s older sibling or something. Who learned it the same way.

This is CHILD lore. Sometimes a fad will come and go in a single age cohort, sometimes it’ll last for generations. It’s kind of awesome.

The idea of child lore and a distinct child culture is really interesting, especially when you consider that children have a few traditions that go back hundreds of years.

For example: did you ever play “Quaker’s meeting?” Quaker’s meeting has begun, no more laughter, no more fun…that dates back two centuries

And of course there’s “Ring around the rosie,” which goes all the way back to the time of the black plague.

Children pass these things down among themselves as part of a legacy they lack the context to fully understand; but you could say the same thing about most adult traditions. That unbroken chain of shared knowledge connects their play to the play of children from hundreds of years ago, without any adult input or encouragement.

That’s cool.

When I was in elementary school, a kid in my grade had just moved from Texas to Colorado and taught us a game that was basically a variation on tag using some specific playground equipment. Nobody had ever played it before, but it caught on like wildfire, and soon, every kid at recess was lining up to play.

When I was in high school, I had to go back to my old elementary school for some reason or another, and walked past the playground to see a group of kids playing the same game. It had been over ten years since that single kid in my class taught this game, and now kids who were too young to even have siblings in high school were playing it.


Another thing like this is “circle circle, dot dot, now I’ve got a cootie shot.” Everyone I know knew this as a kid, even with variations from kids from Europe. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE INTERNET THEN. Was this just a product of a kid moving, teaching it to their new school, and that same cycle repeating?

(via mcbuenopants)